What A Day!

Today we launched our magazine, Global UPdate. Parents, grandparents, friends and guest speakers joined us from near and far to hear about how we wrote our articles, what we learnt and to get their copy of the magazine.  We even had two special guests who weren’t actually in Victoria!

Earlier in the week we were interviewed by Amy from the local newspaper and on Tuesday it hit the stands!  Amy came earlier in the term to talk about writing newspaper articles and we used the information to help write our own articles.  It was great to have Amy come back and see the finished product.  The only problem was that the people in the photo below weren’t actually allowed to open the magazines!  And we’ll let you in on a little secret…they’re only the proof copies that the magazine publishers sent to us so Mrs Placek and Miss Crowther could check things.
 

 

We wore red to support our chosen charity, Red Cross. Nicole from Red Cross spoke about the work Red Cross does and how our money will help people who have been affected by natural disasters. We learnt about natural disasters this term and were affected by the Black Saturday bushfires, so we were really happy to help such a great cause.
 

 
Some of us spoke about how we researched our articles by emailing people at schools around the world.  We explained the process and shared some facts about our articles.  We also had a panel of students who answered questions from the audience on everyone’s behalf.

 

 

 

Mrs Monaghan was a special guest speaker…all the way from England!  It was only 9:15am in Australia but it was 10:15pm on Tuesday night for Mrs Monaghan!  We’re very grateful that she stayed up so she could talk to us about all the great projects we have worked on with her class.  Technology means that we can work and learn with people on the other side of the world and feel like we know them.

 

 

Our third guest speaker was Jeremy Scott who is cycling 50 000km around the world to raise money for The Heart Foundation.  At the moment he is in Sydney.  Click HERE to visit his blog and read about his adventures.  Today was a rest day for Jeremy which was lucky for us because he could talk to us!  Jeremy told us about the things he has seen on his adventure.  In one photo there is an ‘elephant’ road sign!  He has cycled in temperatures of -20 degrees and met bears.  Sometimes it has been really hard to keep going, but he does.  His trick is to think of a hard thing he has done in Turkey and remind himself that nothing is as bad as Turkey.  Jeremy is nearly at the end of his trip as he only has about 5000km left to ride.

 

 

At the end of the launch we finally got to see a copy of the magazine and it was AWESOME!  We ate red velvet cupcakes, red grapes, red apples and red lollies whilst we read our articles.

 

 

 
We all enjoyed sharing our magazine with our family and friends.  We hope we get to write one next year!

What was the most important thing you learnt from publishing the magazine?

If you wrote a magazine, what would you make it about?

 

Global UPdate!

This term one of our main focuses has been to publish a magazine comparing similarities and differences of countries around the world.  And…we’ve done it!  We’ve called our magazine Global UPdate.  The ‘UP‘ is for Upper Plenty.  Our magazine has articles about life all around the world.  From Germany to Tokyo and England to Canada we’ve got it covered.

We worked in teams to write the articles about all sorts of things, including literacy, foods, favourite things, numeracy, schools, fun and games, natural disasters, hobbies, sports and animals.

After weeks and weeks of planning and gathering information through emails and Skype we finally finished our articles!  As we type this post they are being processed at the publishing company.  The company sent us two ‘proof’ copies so that we could check that the layout is perfect and there are no spelling errors or typing mistakes.  We get one more chance to see our updated proofs.

 

The Front Cover

Once we have approved the new proofs the company will print 100 copies of our magazine!  We have decided to sell them for $15 each. We have to pay the publishing company and would like to raise some money for a charity.  Any profits made will go to Red Cross.  This charity was chosen because they support children all around the world and children all around the world helped us write our articles.

Thank you to everyone who helped us with the magazine.  We are looking forward to seeing our published magazine soon!  If you would like to order a copy, please leave your details in a comment below, use the contact form (under ‘Contact’ at the top of the screen) or drop into the School office.

If you wrote a magazine, what would you write about and why?

What magazines do you enjoy reading?  Why?

 

Let Us Explain…

Yesterday was such a lovely day that we decided to work outside for an hour.  Under the shade of an old oak tree, surrounded by fresh country air and a refreshing breeze we drafted and revised our explanations about Egyptian Mummies.

 

 

 

The previous day we gathered information and recorded it in a planning template like the one below.  This was a very important part of the writing process because we didn’t know a lot about how mummies were made.  The template was split into sections to help us write our explanations in the right order.  We had to record the information in our own words.

 

 

After organising our ideas it was time to draft.  We had to make sure we followed the correct structure.

An explanation has:

* An introduction which is a general opening statement that introduces and defines the topic

* Sequenced statements that describe the actions in the order they happen

* A concluding statement

* Supporting diagrams (optional)

 

Aidan’s explanation:

How Were Mummies Made?

A mummy is a dead human body that has been preserved for a long time.  People made mummies 5000 years ago.

It took 70 days to make one mummy.  First, the mummy makes removed all the internal organs, including the brain.  However, they kept the heart because they believed that the soul was kept in the heart. 

Next, the Egyptians applied chemicals to remove the moisture from the body.  Then they wrapped the body in bandages made of linen cloth.  They placed lucky charms between each layer.

Once the body was prepared. It was put is a stone or wood coffin.  The coffins were decorated with pictures of the gods.

Finally, they carried it to a tomb.  The priests performed a ceremony called the Opening of the Mouth ritual.  Family members placed items and food in the tomb to keep the spirit alive.

Making mummies was a long process but Egyptian people believed it was very important.

 

Explanations are a non-fiction text because they are about true things.  Other non-fiction texts are procedures, information reports, recounts and persuasive texts.

 

Have you ever worked outside?  Tell us about it!

What type of non-fiction texts have you read or written?

What would you like us to explain next?

 

The End

Earlier this term our friends Mrs Smith and 4/5DS in Tasmania sent us the first 100 words of a narrative.  Our job?  To write the ending in 100 words.  We did a similar project in Term 2 with Frole Island, except we wrote the first part of the story and they finished it.  Click HERE to read our Term 2 narratives.

The Frole Islanders thought the ending was harder to write than the beginning.  So, we were keen to test out the theory and we AGREE!  We had a great time thinking of possible endings and wonder if they are the endings the original authors had in mind?  Our endings are written in purple.

 

Do you think the beginning or ending of a narrative would be harder to write? Why?

Sur – prise!!!

It all started when 4/5P and 5/6JC got called over the loudspeaker to go to their classrooms at recess. We were wondering what was happening. We saw the lanyards and thought that we were going on an excursion. We all felt a little bit confused until we saw the Mystery Excursion tickets that said:

 

We quickly hopped on the bus and had three clues about  the Mystery Excursion. Our first clue was ‘Friends’ and a little while later we got two more clues, ‘Performance’ and ‘100’.  After the clues, people started guessing: King Kong, another primary school, Hoyts or IMAX. We were pretty sure that it was Killara Primary School after we had our third clue. The reason was because we had sent 100 word narratives to Killara PS for them to complete.

 

 

When we got there, Miss Fraser greeted us with a bearded dragon (lizard) called Sheldon on her shoulder. Soon we were at her classroom and we met the students who had completed our 100 word narratives. As we were reading our narratives we were wondering if they would finish the way we thought they would. We were surprised at some of the endings!  You can read all of our narratives by clicking on the bottom right hand corner of the texts below.  KPS’s endings are in red font.

 

After that our partners gave us a tour of the school. We were shown the gym and after we had finished we went back to the gym to play Penguin Olympics and Golden Child.

We then went to our last activity for the day which was to watch KPS’s school production, Wiping Out Waste (WOW). It was a good production about how to stop people littering. It was an original musical written by their Performing Arts teacher.

We had a great day and hope to see them again soon!

 

Have you been to a live performance before?

What was your favourite part of the Mystery Excursion?

What surprised you about KPS?

200 Word Narratives

Last week we wrote the first 100 words of a narrative with a partner and then emailed them to our blogging friends at Killara Primary School so they could write the next (and last) 100 words.

We had to make sure that we introduced our characters, setting, some events and the beginning of a problem.  It was quite a challenge to use 100 words exactly.  The title did not count in the final word count.  To make sure we used 100 words exactly we had to spend a lot of time choosing the right words and revising our narratives.  We are looking forward to reading the end of the narratives soon!

You can read the start of some of our narratives below. 

 


 How would you end the narratives above?

Leave us the first 100 words of a narrative in a comment! 

Miss Crowther’s Flipped It!

It’s official, Miss Crowther has flipped…our classroom!  Together with Mrs Placek, Miss Crowther is becoming a ‘fully flipped’ teacher with the help of the clever people at Sophia.

It means we will be completing tasks at home so that we already know some things about the topic and focus of our face to face lessons.  By preparing for our face to face lessons more time can be spent doing the ‘hard’ stuff at school with our teacher.

The term ‘Flipped Classroom’ is used to describe what we are doing because we have swapped (or flipped!) around what we do at school and what we do for homework.  Traditionally, we started learning something at school and then practised it more at home.  The only problem was, that if we needed help, our teacher wasn’t there to help us.  Now, we can start at home and continue it at school with our teacher.  We can ask questions, work with others and learn in a better way.

At the moment, our flipped learning focuses mainly around writing.  This week, at school we are writing narratives and learning how to use and punctuate dialogue correctly.  So, this week’s flipped homework is to watch the video below made by Mrs Placek and Miss Crowther about using dialogue correctly.

After watching the video we have to check our understanding by completing a quick quiz.  Click HERE to see (and do!) the quiz.  At school Miss Crowther will help us to apply our learning to punctuate dialogue correctly in our narratives.

Has your teacher flipped it?

What do you think of flipped homework?

 

Metaphorically Speaking…

This week we have been having fun with similes and metaphors.  As part of our Flipped Homework we watched a video explaining each term.  You too can watch it HERE.

We are learning about similes and metaphors so that we can use them in our own writing, especially our narratives.  Today we read a book by Ferg McKinnon and Kim Gamble called ‘A Bee in Ben’s Bonnet.’   It was very cleverly written and full of metaphors.   Even though the title is about ‘bees in a bonnet,’ Ben is not wearing a hat and there are no bees in the story.  If you have a ‘bee in your bonnet’ it means that you are upset or annoyed about something.  Ben is upset that no one seems to have remembered his birthday.

 

A metaphor is an expression or ‘figure of speech.’  The words used do not have their usual literal meaning.  For example, ‘The apple of my eye’ is a metaphor used to describe someone very special.  It does not mean that the person has an apple in their eye.

Here are some of the metaphors used in the book:

We think the book is ‘The bee’s knees’, ‘The cat’s pyjamas’ and as good as gold!

 Can you work out the meaning of the metaphors?

What metaphors have you heard?  Used? Like?

 

Alien Project

Towards the end of Term Two we focussed on writing information reports.  We learnt that good information reports have:
* A general opening statement or classification
* A description
* Related information grouped into paragraphs

* Sub headings
* Summary
* Visual text (photos, diagrams, maps etc.)
* Specialised language
* Present tense
* Use third person
* Sentences with one or more facts

To conclude our report writing focus we wrote a report about a fictional alien to share with Mrs Smith and our friends in 5/6CS in Tasmania.  As they had been learning about Space,  Mrs S suggested we write a report about an alien.  We sent them a copy of our reports (without the visual diagram). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Students in 5/6CS recreated our original aliens from the description in our reports. Check out the results in the slideshow below.

 

 
5/6CS also gave us valuable feedback on our report writing skills.  We sent them a checklist to use about the structure, language and features of our reports.  They filled them in and posted them back to us.
 

Report checklist completed by 5/6CS students

 

Feedback and advice from 5/6CS

 

Feedback and advice from 5/6CS

 

We really enjoyed creating our aliens, writing our reports, sharing them with 5/6CS and reading their feedback. Thank you for working with us Mrs Smith and 5/6CS!

 Have you ever written an information report?  What was it about?

What type of alien would you create?

 

Debating with Technology

Throughout this term a group of students have participated in a Debating Project.  Each week, up to seven students from five different schools meet in an online meeting room. 

Everyone can see and hear each other using the Polycom TV

At the start of the project we learnt how to speak confidently and to ‘think on our feet.’  That means, we had to think quickly and without any notes. Mr O’Brien, the teacher running the project, gave us some fun activities to help us.

What Good Luck, What Bad Luck

In this activity we worked in a small group to tell a story.  The first person started off with ‘What good luck…’ and the next person jumped in with ‘What bad luck…’ and so on. 

For example: ‘What good luck, it is the weekend’

‘What bad luck, there is a power cut and I can’t watch my favourite show’

What good luck, I’ll watch it online later’ and so on

Rabbit On

We each got a topic and had to ‘rabbit on’ for 30 seconds.  ‘Rabbit on’ is another way of saying talk a lot. 

Time to Debate

Soon it was time to participate in an actual debate.  Students from a different school adjudicated (that’s a debating term for scored) and timed each debate.  Each speaker had one minute to argue their team’s point of view.

Listening to our opposition in Debate 1

Our first debate was TV is a Bad Influence on Children and we were the affirmative team.  Our second topic was Cigarettes Should Be Banned and we had to argue that they should not be banned.  The UPPS Debating Team worked hard to present clear, logical arguments and rebutt the opposition’s points.  After two very close debates against strong opposition sides, we won and made it through into the Grand Final.

The Grand Final is this week.  Each school suggested three possible Grand Final topics which were placed in a hat and one was randomly selected.  We are on the affirmative side and have to argue Children Should NOT Be Kept in Detention Centres.  This topic was suggested by Sam so he is very happy about it.  It is also a topic we have discussed in class after reading Morris Gleitzman’s novels Boy Overboard and Girl Underground.  Wish us luck! 

 What do you think… Should children be kept in detention centres?

If you could pick the Grand Final topic, what would it be?